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It Won’t Cost the Earth to Save the Planet says Latest IPCC Report

April 14, 2014
Environmental Protection

The final part of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s fifth report has urged the world’s policy makers to abandon the use of dirty fossil fuels in order to avoid the worst effects of global warming. Climate Change 14: Mitigation of Climate Change which was written by 235 authors from 58 countries dismisses fears that a change in energy policy would harm the world’s economic recovery. It estimates that diverting budgets away from fossil fuels into renewable energy and energy efficiency would cut just 0.06% off the world’s expected economic growth rates.

The report also acknowledges that in the short term, interim energy sources such as gas from fracking may have a part to play as long as long as it is replacing coal burning. Climate Change Secretary Ed Davey is fully behind the findings, saying; “I want other European countries to be more ambitious. We can go green and we can do it in a cheap way. The cost of renewables has been coming down significantly. The longer we leave it, the more difficult and costly it will be.” 

Emissions have increased at an unprecedented rate over the past 40 years with half of the carbon produced since 1750 entering the atmosphere. The overriding message from the IPCC is that doing nothing is now not an option if global temperature rises of between 3.70c and 4.80c by the turn of the century are to be avoided. 

You can download a copy of Climate Change 14: Mitigation of Climate Change here.

The final part of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s fifth report has urged the worlds policy makers to abandon the use of dirty fossil fuels in order to avoid the worst effects of global warming. Climate Change 14: Mitigation of Climate Change which was written by 235 authors from 58 countries dismisses fears that a change in energy policy would harm the worlds economic recovery. It estimates that diverting budgets away from fossil fuels into renewable energy and energy efficiency would cut just 0.06% off the worlds expected economic growth rates.The report also acknowledges that in the short term interim energy sources such as gas from fracking may have a part to play as long as long as it is replacing coal burning. Climate Change Secretary Ed Davey is fully behind the findings, saying; “I want other European countries to be more ambitious. We can go green and we can do it in a cheap way. The cost of renewables has been coming down significantly. The longer we leave it, the more difficult and costly it will be.”  Emissions have increased at an unprecedented rate over the past 40 years with half of the carbon produced since 1750 entering the atmosphere. The overriding message from the IPCC is that doing nothing is now not an option if global temperature rises of between 3.70c and 4.80c by the turn of the century are to be avoided.

 

You can download a copy of Climate Change 14: Mitigation of Climate Change here